2014 Armory Show

The veritable plethora of art fairs and events during Armory Week gives the observer, patron, and aficionado reason to rejoice.  In a sea of imagery there is always land for anchor.  Here are a few from our ports of call.

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JULIAN OPIE, City Walkers. 2014. A pair of powder-coated laser-cut steel wall reliefs. Edition of 50.  Courtesy of Alan Cristea Gallery

A wizard with a finger on a perfectly estranged pulse, Julian Opie, continues to posit the technological notion of physical representation with mundane flair.   Trapped without air, his figures convey the formality of the fair in amusing fashion.

PistolettoArmory.14Pistoletto, (detail) “Venere con la pipa”, 1962/1972, silkscreen on polished stainless steel.  Edition 60. Courtesy of GALLERIAREPETTO

  Pistoletto’s playful work reflected its surroundings with particular languor. The pipe is poetic enough for any insertion, adding the perfect amount of indolence to this moment of repose.

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When we see Wayne Thiebaud’s work, most can’t help but think of confection.  This sturdy portrait reminds us of a course on gender politics, the lone shadow perfectly purple.

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Walt Kuhn (1877-1949), ‘The Grenadier,” 1930, Oil on canvas 30×25 inches.  Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Modern

Walt Kuhn had a healthy admiration for the eccentricities of circus folk. “The Grenadier” assumes the countenance of non-plus, everything from her slouch to the slightly dazed lean of her head expresses ennui.

BalincourtArmory.14Jules de Balincourt, “Alex,” 2013, Oil and acrylic on panel.

This work by Jules de Balincourt takes every beach inspiration and wraps it into a Buddha-like finger gesture.  Praise be the lord.  Mesmerizing in many ways.

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This little gem by artist Atsushi Kaga, was part of a large installation of small works that showed the kind of humor one would imagine from a Japanese artist living in Ireland.